Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #20771
    jeffg
    Member

    Violarob—- You been following me around hey? Ha! I was going to try Radio frequency ablation a while back, but determine my tumors were to many and one to large. Maybe in the future. Yes I recieve Cancer Compass updates weekly and ocassionally post but not very often. I like reading the informational articles to see if anything novel pops up. Hope all is well in the Lone-Star State! Is it true you Texan’s grill your steaks on the tailgate of your pick up trucks? Ha! Gets hot down there!
    Later,
    Jeff G.
    Jeff G.

    #20770
    violarob
    Member

    Dear Jeff: Ahah! I suspected you were doing your own home-made hyperthermia treatment from a post you wrote for “Cancercompass”.

    For some real “cooking” I hope to become eligible for radiofrequency ablation this summer. I am getting off-topic, but have you tried any ablation therapies?

    Violarob in Texas

    #20769
    jeffg
    Member

    Barbara…. Type in Vitamin C in the search window above and you will get at least 10 hits of people who have tried or currently doing. Lots of infor for you to digest.
    Jeff G.

    #20768
    mybdm
    Participant

    Has anyone heard of Vitamin C intravenously? Or Glutathione? Or sodium bicarbonate? Just doing some reding and wondering if anyone has had any experience with any of these.

    My husband’s doctor has stopped his regular chemo fo 5 FU and leukavorin because they are not working.

    Barbara

    #20767
    jpsenka
    Member

    Hi Everyone,

    I’ve looked into fever therapy a bit. I believe it has its roots in a therapy referred to as Cooley’s Toxin. Cooley was a physician who noticed that high, repeated fevers caused tumor regression. It is still a matter of debate whether Cooley’s Toxin works via immune activation, or by “cooking” the tumors. It is known that tumors often don’t have the same level of vascularization as normal tissue, and this prevents them from cooling themselves easily. One interesting aspect of using hyperthermia with blood-based treatments like chemo is that the heat can cause blood vessels to dilate and deliver more blood, and hence more therapy to the tumor. Tumors can defend themselves from excessive heat by producing something called Heat-Shock Protein 27. The level of this protein can be measured in a biopsy sample, but this is frequently done in the US. Hope this helps!

    #20766
    jeffg
    Member

    Violarob…I have heard of and been praticing my own method just similar to what your doing. I use the ole bath tub hot and once in add a little more heat. I look like a steamed lobster. Three time a week good at least twice. rehydrate afterward. Only 20 minute each time in tub. My wife said I reminded her of that coppertone suntan commercial of the kid on the beach and dog tugging at her swim suit. Ha! I feel it hammpers growth of tumors and at thre same time reduce anxiety and stress a couple contributers to the problem to begin with.
    Jeff G.

    #20765
    karen
    Member

    Violarob,

    Thank you for the input. I do appreciate.

    Karen

    #20764
    violarob
    Member

    hyperthermia treatment: I did a whole bunch of research on this 2 months ago. The options in the US are paltry. There is one clinic in California which is doing work in hyperthermia. Cancer Treatment Centers of America has two locations which do some hyperthermia treatments (Tulsa and Philadelphia). There is a phase II study in Houston, at the University of Texas Medical School, being administered by Joan Bull, M.D.

    There are two basic types of hyperthermia: One is regional or local, which is administered by radio wave diathermy directly to the affected area. This is effective only if the tumor(s) are less than 4 cm from the surface. The second type is called whole body hyperthermia, where the temperature of the entire body is raised to fever range (103-105 degrees) for a long period of time, up to 6 hours. There is a clinic in Germany (the Klinik St. Georges?) which offers hyperthermia. Don’t know anything about them.

    I have adopted my own hyperthermia method which I implement at home. 24 hours after I receive my chemo infusion, I spend an hour in the jacuzzi, until my body temperature raises to 102 degrees. I then dry off and rest on the couch wrapped in blankets, with a heating pad on my abdomen. It takes about an hour for my core body temperature to return to normal. Please do not try this on your own until you have done LOTS of research online about the different methods used and precautions needed.

    The basic concept: Raising the core body temperature has been shown to stress the tumors, making them more susceptible to the chemo. Results vary widely from person to person. I know of others who spend 15-20 minutes per day in a dry or wet sauna to raise their core temperature each day to stress the tumors and to sweat out toxins.

    There is lots of info on the internet on hyperthermia. Good luck to those who are interested in this subject!

    Violarob in Texas

    #20763
    rank
    Member

    I did some research on this earlier this year and it sounded interesting and scary. I would be interested in learning if anyone has tried it or knows of someone who has.

    #1339
    karen
    Member

    Does anyone have any information of fever therapy? Is it available in the US? Sounds pretty interesting on various websites. Thoughts please.
    Karen

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