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Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

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  • #95024
    bglass
    Moderator

    Dear Karen,

    I really appreciate your wise words on the complicated emotions we all feel with a cancer diagnosis.

    Our rare cancer is especially tough as it is so hard to find folks with first-hand experience, whether doctors, other caregivers or other patients, to help us navigate this incredibly difficult path. For example, in my own case, I only first met and spoke to another patient with CCA sixteen months after I was diagnosed.

    The Foundation is a lifesaver in this regard.

    You are spot on in calling on us to be educated and not to fear science. The information on this cancer is hard to find sometimes, tough to understand and digest. But I guess we all have to go to CCA school best we can, so when the moments come to make quick treatment choices, we can fully participate and know what we are getting into.

    Regards, Mary

    #95023
    gavin
    Moderator

    Great post Karen, thanks loads for that!

    #95022
    positivity
    Participant

    Thank you so much for sharing Karen! As a daughter with a mom with CC, emotions can overwhelm you when information is being processed at a rapid rate. This included knowledge on the condition and the many symptoms and negative talk the doctors are sharing at this time. As a caretaker/advocate it was extremely important to take quiet time and absorb everything and not act in haste with treatment. One will drown and be exhausted as a family member. I chose to be proactive and I continue to be making smart decisions, even though not accepted at times, but doing what I believe is the best in our individual case. That is extremely difficult, but rather be a participant then accept and not do anything. Every case is unique, and some patients may have more than one medical condition.

    #95021
    karend
    Participant

    Cancer is a cruel disease which tests the strength and emotional resilience of individuals, including caregivers and others. There is a ripple effect, spreading outward from the person diagnosed.

    Care must be given to all who are affected, as emotions can be overwhelming leading individuals to develop complicated grieving. I see this as anger at others, anger at the system, anger at life, fear of loss, fear of the unknown, fear of authority, fear of a loss of control, and great sadness manifested as other emotions.

    I am speaking about this from a place of understanding, not only as someone who has witnessed many, many family members struggle with cancer, some who are surviving and others who have not, but also someone who has physically been changed because of cancer. I am also a nurse who has cared for individuals (and their families) with cancer for years. It can be a messy ride, but it can also be a time of togetherness and great clarity if we allow it to be.

    Listen and trust in those who are trying to help, but do also be educated about the disease, your own health (emotional and physical), and be proactive. Advocate for yourself/ family member/friend, become an active team member in treatment or after treatment, do not fear science and those who work to care for you or others, collaborate and share ideas.

    I am sorry if this post bothers anyone, but this topic has been weighing heavily on my heart and I felt the need to thoughtfully share my feelings.

    -Karen

    #95020
    bglass
    Moderator

    Jeff,

    I looked at the list again, and only about 30 are likely medical doctors in the U.S. Other mentioned deaths are of other types of healthcare professionals who would not be included in an estimate using figures for medical doctors. Or they are people in other countries (UK, Honduras, Canada, etc.) hence not included in numbers for the U.S. I suspect that not all 30 fit what must be a narrow definition of “holistic doctor” if there are only 4000 of them out of a million doctors in the U.S.

    So nothing seems proven here – these deaths still seem to me nothing outside what death rate data would predict. The author does seem to be scouring published news reports and obits to find examples that fit her theory, so the 30 or so doctors mentioned are probably close to a full list, and are similar in number to your own estimate (32) of an amount of deaths we should not find to be remarkable.

    I don’t know what Snopes is, and took my numbers from reliable published sources. I can assure you I am not bought off by any large corporation. I do have a deep respect for evidence and statistics, and this reporting just isn’t convincing to me. I guess we can agree to disagree!

    Regards, Mary

    #95019
    taylorjm
    Participant
    BGlass wrote:
    Jeff,

    I looked at the article you attached, and want to make an observation.

    The U.S. is a very large country, and there is need to be cautious when looking at stories that try to generalize from a small number of cases.

    For example, there are about 1 million doctors in the U.S., and about 18 million health professionals of all sorts. The annual death rate for the U.S. population is about 0.8 percent, so in a given year, on very rough back-of-envelope average, about 8,000 doctors and 144,000 healthcare workers would pass away from all causes. If you divide this up by causes of death, then just for doctors, again with very rough averaging, there might be in the ballpark of 132 suicides, 101 gun deaths, and 419 accidental deaths in a year in the U.S. Widening this to more types of health professionals would expand the numbers even more.

    It would then be very easy for someone to troll the internet and selectively find cases that fit ANY possible theory about circumstances of death for any group because there are always big numbers of cases to pick through.

    Selectively picking a few cases that match a theory, however, is not proof of the theory’s correctness. Cancer is a terrible disease and it challenges people’s logic that a country that sent astronauts to the moon and figured out how to build an atomic bomb has not yet been able to solve the cancer puzzle, namely find a cure. My own belief is that cancer is just a much harder puzzle. Speaking for myself, this frustration is most intense when you are a patient or caregiver.

    Regards, Mary

    Hi Mary. I read the same numbers you were quoting on snopes. But snopes has been proven to be bought off by several large companies and their data is flawed. But to make your numbers more accurate, we need to just look at the holistic doctors. There are approximately 4000 holistic doctors in the US. If we take the 0.8% average death rate, that comes out to 32 die per year of natural causes. So in the past year, over twice as many holistic doctors died when compared to the national average. Does that mean something or not? It’s hard to say.

    Jeff

    #95018
    marions
    Moderator

    positivity…more harm than good depends on the individual circumstances and the patient’s desire and options available to fight his/her disease. Overall life has been extended with the various treatment options, but it doesn’t fit everyone. This cancer is unique in it’s presentation and should be evaluated case by case.

    Hugs
    Marion

    #95017
    positivity
    Participant

    Yes, we have to be very careful and wise as patients and caretakers as to the treatment we are willing to pursue to control our condition. Some conventional treatment based on the individual patient may do more harm than good and the same would go for a natural treatment. This is the road I have been taking for months now. It is a constant observation and modify as we continue with this chronic condition. I didn’t want to use cancer, and prefer chronic condition.

    #95016
    marions
    Moderator

    Thanks, Gavin, for adding the link

    Hugs
    Marion

    #95015
    bglass
    Moderator

    Jeff,

    I looked at the article you attached, and want to make an observation.

    The U.S. is a very large country, and there is need to be cautious when looking at stories that try to generalize from a small number of cases.

    For example, there are about 1 million doctors in the U.S., and about 18 million health professionals of all sorts. The annual death rate for the U.S. population is about 0.8 percent, so in a given year, on very rough back-of-envelope average, about 8,000 doctors and 144,000 healthcare workers would pass away from all causes. If you divide this up by causes of death, then just for doctors, again with very rough averaging, there might be in the ballpark of 132 suicides, 101 gun deaths, and 419 accidental deaths in a year in the U.S. Widening this to more types of health professionals would expand the numbers even more.

    It would then be very easy for someone to troll the internet and selectively find cases that fit ANY possible theory about circumstances of death for any group because there are always big numbers of cases to pick through.

    Selectively picking a few cases that match a theory, however, is not proof of the theory’s correctness. Cancer is a terrible disease and it challenges people’s logic that a country that sent astronauts to the moon and figured out how to build an atomic bomb has not yet been able to solve the cancer puzzle, namely find a cure. My own belief is that cancer is just a much harder puzzle. Speaking for myself, this frustration is most intense when you are a patient or caregiver.

    Regards, Mary

    #95014
    taylorjm
    Participant

    There will never “officially” be a cure for cancer. There are billions and billions of dollars made off cancer patients annually. The cost for oncology visits, chemo, radiation, etc are all big money makers for the pharmaceutical companies. What about the 60 holistic doctors that are either dead or missing? Many of them were successfully curing different types of cancer, and when they get to the point where they can start publishing their results, they meet with an unfortunate suicide. People with families and a happy life all the sudden “fall” off a cliff, or hang themselves in the backyard, or shoot themselves in the chest. Or all they find is a vehicle and the person is never seen again. Of course, they always say it was suicide. I believe it was summer of 2015 when over 20 holistic doctors died of mysterious causes. How about the one cancer researcher in Washington who authorities said walked 1.5 miles through brambles and mud, climbed into a culvert, and put a plastic bag over her head, suffocating and committing suicide. Uh huh, yeah. Sure sounds like a lot of trouble for someone to go to just to kill themselves.

    http://www.healthnutnews.com/recap-on-my-unintended-series-the-holistic-doctor-deaths/

    #95013
    taylorjm
    Participant
    positivity wrote:
    Yes! So true. People get desperate for cures, but please choose wisely if you go the alternative route. First, think about controlling the condition, symptoms, or cancer before the cure.

    Unfortunately, this is how most modern medicine works. Too many times doctors treat the symptoms and not the cause. They don’t want to treat the cause, they make more money just treating the symptoms and keep people coming back every month.

    #95012
    gavin
    Moderator

    I take it this is the actual link Marion?

    https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm048383.htm

    And just to add to what you said Positivity, to anyone considering another alternative treatment etc, please please please at the very least come to here and look for info, opinions etc on it. That as well as talking with your med team of course.

    Gavin

    #95011
    positivity
    Participant

    Yes! So true. People get desperate for cures, but please choose wisely if you go the alternative route. First, think about controlling the condition, symptoms, or cancer before the cure.

    #13377
    marions
    Moderator

    FDA report: Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

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