SWOG Launches National Immunotherapy Clinical Trial for Rare Cancers

Discussion Board Forums Clinical Trials SWOG Launches National Immunotherapy Clinical Trial for Rare Cancers

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  • #93994
    marions
    Moderator

    positivity…I agree. Research is heading the way of deciphering how our own bodies work and how our own bodies behave when certain molecular errors occur, which allow cancers from reproducing. Why are those checkpoints inactive, which should recognize that certain cells are growing out of control.

    These type of clinical trials help us understand. We see that even the healthiest life styles don’t prevent the development of cancer. How much is genetic and how much is lifestyle induced? Huge questions.

    Hugs
    Marion

    #93993
    positivity
    Participant

    Thanks Marion for updating the board on new treatment studies. I want to see more alternatives to chemo for patients who don’t respond well to chemo or have unbearable side effects. I dislike seeing chemo as the standard treatment for CC, and hope to see more promising results with alternatives.

    #12967
    marions
    Moderator

    The trial is called DART (Dual Anti–CTLA-4 and Anti–PD-1 Blockade in Rare Tumors) and is managed by SWOG, the cancer clinical trials group that is part of the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN).

    It is in conjunction with the NCI – MATCH program. Patients not having treatment options under MATCH, or if they didn’t respond to treatment on that trial, and their cancer is eligible, they can enroll.

    https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/clinical-trials/nci-supported/nci-match

    DART patients will be treated with two immunotherapy drugs—ipilimumab plus nivolumab—a combination treatment that helps the immune system fight cancer.

    Hugs
    Marion

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