Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #26926
    marions
    Moderator

    Jim…ha, ha, I should have known. You have already figured it out. I live in the wine country and you won’t believe it but, at several gatherings I have seen people drink non-alcoholic wine also. So, there is hope for your glass of wine with a meal.

    #26925
    jim-wilde
    Member

    Been doing that for years as a post cardiac person. If it tastes good, spit it out (all the best foods, of course).

    There is some feeble hope, though. I’ve found non-alcoholic beers aren’t too bad, and Coors is actually good. I do miss the wine with a meal. But, can’t have it all.

    #26924
    marions
    Moderator

    Jim….Can you fool your palette and take a sip and spit it back out?

    #26923
    lainy
    Participant

    Now, Jim, don’t wine about the beer!!!! :):)

    #26922
    jim-wilde
    Member

    Yah, but no beer or wine in my future!

    #26921
    marions
    Moderator

    Jim…that is so very interesting to hear. Your resection actually was quite minimal in comparison to most of our members. You retained 50% viable liver function. That is great news.
    All my best,
    Marion

    #26920
    lainy
    Participant

    Marion, interesting. The good doctor has a label that reads like a who’s who of titles! Excellent. Must be a brilliant man.

    #26919
    nur1954
    Participant

    Marion – Dr. Geschwind is quite the man, isn’t he? He was the doctor who did John’s two chemo-embolizations. We were very impressed with him and his knowledge was invaluable to us at the time. What a nice guy! – Nancy

    #26918
    jim-wilde
    Member

    Just so some don’t get panicky, regeneration doesn’t always happen. Mine did not, probably due primarily that I had chemo within two months of a resection. Not surprisingly, almost no cell growth occurs during chemo, and this includes wound healing as well. Almost two years later, no regeneration. Regeneration is also a function of patient age, and that didn’t help me at all and older patients experience slower regeneration. The good news: Ive got a 50% liver that’s working perfectly.

    #2061
    marions
    Moderator

    I had the opportunity to speak with:
    Dr. J.F. Geschwind, M.D., Associate Professor of Radiology, Surgery, and Oncology Division Chief, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Director, Image Guided Interventional Laboratory, John Hopkins Medicine.

    Dr. Geschwind explained that the liver does regenerate to its previous size in 4 to 6 weeks this includes, an atrophied lobe. The major vessels stay in tact in an atrophied lobe and due to generation it will form back in volume to its original size.

    It was discussed, in the symposium, that resection can include anything up to 30% of the liver. The volume of the liver is directly related to the size of the person – small people have smaller livers -.

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