Post surgical or treatment idea!

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #18474
    ron-smith
    Member

    Hi Kris

    Don’t take it personal. I didn’t get a bottle to blow into in Edinburgh either and I never had pneumonia. I did have the “gasps” but just put that down to fear that I was going to feel some pain at the op site. Never happened of course, but the mind is a powerful thing.

    Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year (to all of us).

    Ron

    #18473
    jeffg
    Member

    Hi Kris … I had the ping pong ball doo-Hickey as well. But seeing how many bubbles you can blow sounds like more fun to me.
    Have a Merry Christmas, You and the Family!
    God Bless.
    JeffG

    #18472
    carol58
    Member

    Kris, you’re far from clueless…you’re a NUT! Merry Christmas and lots of love.

    Carol

    #18471
    devoncat
    Member

    Um, now I am just feeling silly and a little neglected. Did the hospital in Edinburgh think me unworthy of such blowing games? Why was everyone else given such things and me not…is it a conspiracy? There I thought I was being helpful when all along I was just clueless. Seriously, glad to know it really does help.

    Kris

    #18470
    lselby
    Member

    Hi to all,
    The device you are talking about is an incentive spirometer. Very important. I was a little troubled by the fact that my father wasn’t offered one initially during his 4 day stay at Mayo, until I asked. He had some problems breathing post anesthia. They do work to help prevent post-op pneumonia.
    Lana

    #18469
    peter
    Member

    I had a device with a ping pong ball in in tube and I was suppose to blow hard enough to hold it up at a certain level. Sounds like the same concept. I never got pneumonia either.

    #18468
    carol58
    Member

    Hi Kris, they brought something similar in to Charlie after his resection at Chapel Hill. No water involved though. It looked kind of like a child’s toy. He would blow into it and make the ball inside a clear tube go to the top. They said it was to help with the same 2 things you said. He did it several times an hour. It must have helped because he never got pneumonia.

    Carol

    #988
    devoncat
    Member

    When I was in the hospital, the nurse brought me a bottle (about 1 liter size) filled half way with water and a large tube. I had to blow bubbles 10 times an hour-take as big a breath as possible and slowly blow. It was supposed to do two things-1)help prevent pneumonia and 2)help with lung capacity and strength after surgery and being on your back too long.
    They did not do this in Edinburgh when I had my surgery and I had terrible “gasps” for about 4 months when my breath would catch. I wonder if this would have helped? It seemed to help with the pain of deep breathing after a day of doing it.

    Thought I would pass that along as I had not seen it before but it seems to help.

    Kris

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
©2019 - All Rights Reserved, Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation